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Local Activities

Cavan County Museum

Located less than a 15 minute drive from the hotel a visit to Cavan County Museum is a must during your stay and discover the heritage and culture of County Cavan.

The Museum is home to exhibition galleries featuring unique artefacts dating from the stone age up until the twentieth century, material spanning over 6000 years of occupation in Cavan. Displays of notable interest include the Killycluggin stone and the three-faced Corleck Head, two of the most recognisable examples of Celtic spirituality in the country.

The museum also houses a medieval Dug-Out boat and a selection of medieval Sheela-na-Gigs, as well as a Folk Life gallery depicting life in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Newly-opened galleries deal with topics as diverse as the Great Famine, Percy French and the Lords Farnham. Our temporary exhibition space plays host to visiting and currently relevant exhibitions, whilst our Eden Gallery is home to regular art shows given by local and national artists.

Cavan County Museum
Loughcrew Cairns

Loughcrew Cairns

Located approximately a 25 minute drive from the hotel, the Loughcrew cairns, also known as the Hills of the Witch, are a group of Neolithic passage tombs near Oldcastle in County Meath. Spread over four undulating peaks, the tombs are of great antiquity, dating to 3000 BC. Cairn T is one of the largest tombs in the complex. Inside it lies a cruciform chamber, a corbelled roof and some of the most beautiful examples of Neolithic art in Ireland. The cairn is aligned to sunrise at the spring and autumn equinoxes and at these times people gather there to greet the first rays of the sun.

Cuilcagh Boardwalk

Located approximately an hour’s drive from the hotel, The Cuilcagh Boardwalk Trail, also nicknamed the Stairway to Heaven Walk, is located in Co. Fermanagh. The route meanders through one of the largest expanses of blanket bog in Northern Ireland, traversing over tracks, boardwalk and staircase. A steep climb is required to reach the viewing platform which provides breath taking views of the surrounding low lands.

The first part of the walk passes through a fascinating limestone landscape, often referred to as “The Fertile Rock” due to its flower rich pastures. Visible along the trail you will see abandoned Irish cottages, dry stone walls and potato cultivation ridges (“lazy beds”) all remnants of Ireland’s past heritage.

Continuing along the gravel vehicle track the landscape starts to change to blanket bog where the unmistakable, flat-topped ridge of Cuilcagh Mountain is visible in the horizon. In the spring, an abundance of bog cotton carpets the bog in a blanket of white, while in late summer the purple moor grass glistens with shades of red and purple.

After 4km, you start your ascent of Cuilcagh Mountain. The way is negotiated by a section of boardwalk, providing protection to the sensitive blanket bog beneath. If you’re fortunate you may catch a glimpse of a red grouse. The bird’s most obvious features are its plump shape, white eyelids with bright pinkish-red combs above, and feathered legs and feet. They stay on the heath all year round eating the short, succulent shoots of heather.

Your final ascent is via a steep section of steps, these are not for the faint of heart! As you steadily climb you meander and weave your way through a rugged boulder landscape to eventually reach the viewing platform. The viewing platform positioned precariously at the edge of the mountain plateau offers breath-taking views over the surrounding landscape and an opportunity to take a well-deserved rest before starting your descent.

Cuilcagh Boardwalk
Loughcrew Estate

Loughcrew Gardens

Loughcrew is an estate made up of 200 acres of picturesque rolling parkland complete with a stunning house and gardens. It provides the perfect family friendly day out as there is something to suit all ages and interests.
The House and Gardens within at Loughcrew Estate date back to the 17th century – making it a landscape of historical and religious significance. Here, you’ll find a medieval motte and St. Oliver Plunkett’s family church among other old buildings. You’ll also find lime and yew avenues, extensive lawns and terraces, a water garden and a magnificent herbaceous border. There is a Fairy Trail for children and a coffee shop too!

Cavan Burren Park

Located approximately a 75 minute drive from the hotel, the Cavan Burren Park is perfect for a day excursion. The Park opened to the public in May 2014. But the site itself goes back a little longer…probably around 340 million years to the Carboniferous period when this whole area was covered in a shallow tropical sea.

Today you can experience a wonderful interpretative centre and five amazing walking trails around Cavan Burren Park, all highlighting the spectacular prehistoric tombs, fantastic geology and special stories that make this such a unique environment.

Carefully placed interpretation throughout this site explains all the features as you take in the 360° views. Stories of Giants and moving glaciers come to life with every step you take in this breath-taking prehistoric park.

Cavan Burren Park